Henna

Henna, India, 28 June 1991

The story revolves around the mistaken straying (due to a car accident which also caused him to suffer amnesia) of Rishi Kapoor into the Pakistani side of Kashmir from his own home in Srinagar . A native girl called Henna (Zeba Bakhtiar), falls in love with him , amidst the controversial Indian-Pakistani tension on Kashmir which leads him to be suspected by the Pakistani police of being an Indian spy.

Beautiful Henna Khan lives the life of a gypsy near the river, Jhelum, in Pakistan with her widowed dad, Khan Baba; three brothers, Ashraf, Razzak, and Zaman. One day she comes across a male body that has been washed ashore. Khan Baba, Bibi Gul, and Henna take this male in, nurse him back to health, only to find out that he has lost his memory. The male in his sleep cries out the name of "Chand", and everyone starts calling him by that name. Soon he is well enough to walk around and starts working for Bibi and helping her make clay pots. Henna falls in love with him and would like to marry him, much to the chagrin of Daroga Shahbaaz Khan (Raza Murad), who has already been married twice, but according to Shariat Law he can marry twice more. Khan Baba arranges the marriage of Henna and Chand and a day is set for the marriage. The tribe will soon find out that Chand is not a Muslim, neither is he from Pakistan, but will soon confess to the Daroga that he is a Hindu, an Indian sent by the Indian Government to spy on the Pakistanis.

  • Genre: Romantic
  • Runtime: 184 minutes
  • Director: Randhir Kapoor

Story

Henna is the name of a 1991 Bollywood film produced and directed by Randhir Kapoor and starring his brother Rishi Kapoor, Ashwini Bhave (both of India) and Zeba Bakhtiyar (of Pakistan) also renowned as Neha Seti. It was shot in Kashmir. This film's project was planned and started by legendary director Raj Kapoor but due to his demise during the filming stage, the remaining portions were directed by his son Randhir Kapoor. Hence, this film is considered as the last film of Raj Kapoor. The film was an Indo-Pak project, hence the dialogues of the film were written by the Pakistani legendary writer Haseena Moin on Raj Kapoor's personal request. The film was a critical and a commercial success and was also India's submission for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, but was not accepted as a nominee.[1]